Review: Lenovo Twist Laptop

Lenovo Twist Laptop Recently I decided to purchase a new laptop now that I have graduated college. I have been using the same Dell XPS for the last 4 years and even though it still works it has suffered decent wear and tear. I constantly carry my laptops with me everywhere I go, always finding some sort of work to do or necessary need for it. So I began looking into the new technology on laptops and some of the features that I would want. This is when i found out the laptop market is a new type of beast. With all the new different types of laptops out there it is extremely complicated deciding what features best fit your needs nevermind which brand to choose from. I was in no rush to buy a new laptop because I wanted to thoroughly research each one and find something that would be perfect for my specific needs. After a bit of online research, I came to the decision that I wanted a high performance “Convertible” laptop. A convertible laptop is a touch screen laptop where the screen can be rotated or slid over the keyboard converting it into a tablet.

Now with the type of laptop decided it was onto the more complex part of choosing, deciding what brand to buy then what specifications the laptop required. Luckily I have a strong knowledge of computer statistics and knew the exact specifications I needed for both work and entertainment. I wanted an i7 with both a solid state hard drive (no moving parts) and a hard disk drive. One of the most important factors was reliability and durability, I carry my laptop with me everywhere I go…Literally I always have it so if it can’t take some rugged situations then it will have a short life span.


Price: $1100 (www.lenovo.com – $1400 after 4 year warranty)
Ownership Length: 2 months
Buy at Amazon.com (aff)


Pros:
1) Portability and adaptability – It is so light and ultra thin that it’s almost mesmerizing watching it transform back and forth from tablet to laptop. Fully functional laptop when I’m at a desk and folds into a tablet when I need to be mobile.
2) Speed – The Intel Core i7 has been unbelievably fast.
3) Durability – Gorilla glass screen and tough Lenovo ThinkPad parts combine to make a sturdy machine. (I got a screen protector because of touch features)

Cons:
1) Not 1080p HD – 12.5″ W HD (1366 x 768) LED Backlight, but it is Gorilla Glass
2) HDMI mini out – I don’t know why they did not put a full-size HDMI port in this laptop, requiring me to get an adapter is somewhat frustrating
3) Display orientation – This is a very minute criticism that I am only mentioning because it can be slightly frustrating. The screen rotation sometimes acts strange and whatever orientation it is in when it’s slept/turned off will be how it is going to startup until you are logged in, then it becomes active.

Summary

This laptop has been completely perfect for me. I was impressed when I first had unboxed it; before I had even fired it up it had me smiling. I knew it would be smaller than my old laptop but never realized this would only be a ¼ of its size.

This laptop has more than impressed me, it has spoiled me with its portability and has almost rendered my iPad as an entertainment only device. I’ve used IBM and Lenovo products before and they have a very crisp and responsive feel, this being a ThinkPad has the same overall good feel with the addition of a touchscreen and innovative portability. If you want a laptop that basically functions as a tablet just as efficiently and have strong value on dependability this should be one of your major considerations.

Tech Specs
Processor: Intel Core i7-3537U on MB
Operating system: Windows 8 64
Operating system Language: Win8 64 English
Total memory: 8 GB PC3-10600 DDR3L on MB
Hard drive: 500GB HDD 7200rpm
Battery: 8 cell Li-Polymer 42.4Wh S230u
WiFi wireless LAN adapters: Intel CW-N 2230 (2x2BGN&BT4)
Display Panel: S230u 12.5WHD,NW Mocha
Storage Adapter: 24GB Micro SSD SATA3 Win8
System Unit: S230u Intel HD, i7-3537U 8GB

MacBook Pro or iMac?

My iMac Experience

iMacI’ve been lusting after an iMac for years. As I got to the end of my college career, I began to think that my aging laptop might not necessarily need to be replaced with another laptop, and that a desktop would do just fine. This idea grew into a full-fledged WANT well before I graduated in 2011, but I didn’t actively start saving for a desktop until early 2012.

Part of this desire for an iMac stemmed from the receptionist job I worked in college. Most offices at Boston College (or, at least, the ones I worked in) were equipped with iMacs rather than Windows desktops. The summer before my senior year, one of the offices I worked in underwent a long-overdue hardware update; that fall, the other office I worked in followed. The iMacs we got had been out for a few years, but they were gorgeous, and only cemented my desire for one of my own.

Near the end of 2012, as my savings account neared its goal of $1,750, Apple announced they would have a new iMac out that winter. This model, instead of requiring you to upgrade to a 1TB hard drive (which I had planned to do), would come standard with one. Jackpot! I decided I could wait a few more weeks for the computer to come out.

And so I waited, and I waited, and I waited. There was a two-week period during which I called all of the Apple stores in a 30-mile radius every day, asking if they had any iMacs in stock. I didn’t want to order online for fear that my beautiful new computer would sit on my doorstep all day, easy pickings for the computer-stealers that roam the streets. But finally, I decided I could wait no longer, and ordered my iMac online. (I shipped it to my office so that I wouldn’t have to worry about it sitting on my stoop.)

After six blissful months with my iMac, I have to say that I love it. The display is beautiful. It’s lightning-fast. It runs historically glitchy games like The Sims perfectly (or at least about as well as could be hoped for). I love being able to open a zillion Safari tabs in the huge screen, and I love that the computer is still fast enough to handle it. Looking at photos in all their 21.5” glory is a magical experience.

There are a few imperfections, though they’re minor. First, FaceTime always seems to fail on the first try. Jeff, Alex and I meet monthly over video chat, and when Jeff calls me from his iPad and I answer, it always freezes on the “connecting…” screen for several minutes, prompting me to hang up and call him. But from there, it always works smoothly.

Something else that annoys me, really through no fault of its own, is the battery life of the wireless accessories (trackpad, keyboard). I’d never had a keyboard or trackpad that was powered separately from the computer itself before (previously they’d always either been wired or attached to a laptop), so when my mouse pointer wasn’t responding one day I flat out panicked before realizing, oh, it’s probably the battery. Duh.

Finally, I’m not too crazy about Apple’s suite of office products. However, I haven’t had much use for them yet, so I will save my review of Pages, Numbers, and Keynote for another day once I have used them more intensively.

Here are the specs of my iMac:

PROCESSOR: 2.7GHz Quad-Core Intel Core i5
MEMORY: 8GB 1600MHz DDR3 SDRAM-2X4GB
HARD DRIVE: 1TB 5400-rpm Serial ATA Drive
GRAPHICS: NVIDIAGeFrc GT 640M 512M GDDR5
MOUSE: MAGIC TRACKPAD
PAGES: PAGES PREINSTALLED
NUMBERS: NUMBERS PREINSTALLED
KEYNOTE: KEYNOTE PREINSTALLED
APPLE KEYBOARD: Apple WL Kybd (English)+UG
COUNTRY KIT: COUNTRY KIT

Altogether, that added up to about $1,440. It’s not cheap, but for such a gorgeous computer, it was worth every penny.
Buy at Amazon.com (aff)